Greenpeace
Source: Greenpeace |

Greenpeace Activists Ship Plastic Monster Back to Nestlé’s Factory in Kenya

Activists also held protests at Nestlé offices in the Philippines, Germany and other countries across the globe

Greenpeace Africa (https://www.Greenpeace.org/africa) activists and volunteers delivered a #PlasticMonster partly covered with Nestlé branded plastic packagingright back to its source: the Nestlé factory servicing Kenya and other East African countries calling on the multinational corporation to end its reliance on single-use plastic. Activists also held protests at Nestlé offices in the Philippines,…

Source: Greenpeace |

Nestlé, Unilever, Coca Cola and Diageo double-down on recycling myth across Africa

In their statement, these Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCGs) companies once again bet on recycling as a solution to the global plastics crisis on the continent

Nestlé, Unilever, The Coca Cola Company and Diageo announced plans today (http://bit.ly/2TF9ArY) to improve the collection and recycling of plastics across Africa by launching the Africa Plastics Recycling Alliance. In their statement, these Fast-Moving Consumer Goods (FMCGs) companies once again bet on recycling as a solution to the global plastics crisis on the…

Greenpeace
Source: Greenpeace |

Eskom cannot be given a new licence to kill

Between April 2016 and December 2017, Eskom’s seventeen coal-fired power stations reported nearly 3,200 exceedances of their daily Atmospheric Emissions Licenses limits for particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, and oxides of nitrogen

Yesterday, Greenpeace Africa (www.Greenpeace.org) submitted comments to Naledzi Environmental Consultants [1] opposing Eskom's application for postponements and suspensions [2] from complying with South Africa's Minimum Emission Standards (MES). The MES, which are relatively weak [3], are designed to improve air quality in the country, but this has been significantly compromised…

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    • Greenpeace Africa projects ‘coal kills’ message on Duvha coal-fired power station in Mpumalanga - South Africa, in response to the news that the province is the biggest pollution hotspot in the world. Greenpeace calls on the South African government to ensure Eskom complies with air quality legislation and that a coal-free IRP is finalised this year to provide clean and healthy air for all
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Source: Greenpeace |

New satellite data reveals the world’s largest air pollution hotspot is Mpumalanga - South Africa

Mpumalanga is home to a cluster of twelve coal fired power plants with a total capacity of over 32 gigawatts owned and operated by Eskom

A groundbreaking analysis of satellite data from 1 June to 31 August this year [1] reveals the world’s largest NO2 air pollution hotspots across six continents in the most detail to date. Greenpeace (www.Greenpeace.org) analysis of the data points to coal and transport as the two principle sources of air…

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    • (1) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (2) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (3) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (4) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (5) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (6) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (7) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
    • (8) Photo credits to Mujahid Safodien: Greenpeace Africa activists in collaboration with the life after coal Campaign scale Mandela Bridge in Johannesburg in protest against the inclusion of new coal infrastructure in the country's draft electricity plan (IRP 2018)
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Source: Greenpeace |

Life after Coal and Greenpeace Africa slam Inclusion of New Coal in Electricity Plan

The Life After Coal Campaign and Greenpeace Africa argue that the inclusion of an additional 1000 MW of new coal-fired power puts the Department of Energy in conflict with the rights enshrined in the Constitution

The inclusion of new coal in the updated draft Integrated Resource Plan for Electricity (IRP) will cost South Africa close to R20 billion more than we need to spend, and will make electricity more expensive for all South Africans. If the Department of Energy were to publish the least-cost plan…